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[Illustration: "Dave caught at the knife-wrist."

_Frontispiece_]





Dave Darrin on Mediterranean Service

OR

With Dan Dalzell on European Duty

By

H. IRVING HANCOCK

Author of "Dave Darrin at Vera Cruz," "Dave Darrin's
South American Cruise," The West Point Series,
The Annapolis Series, The Boys of the
Army Series, Etc., etc.

Illustrated

P H I L A D E L P H I A
HENRY ALTEMUS COMPANY




COPYRIGHT, 1919, BY
HOWARD E. ALTEMUS




CONTENTS


PAGE


CHAPTER I--GREEN HAT, THE TROUBLE-STARTER 11

Dave Darrin and Dan Dalzell, while ashore at
Gibraltar, have an exciting experience with a spy
and stir up a deep mystery.


CHAPTER II--DAN'S THIRTY-THREE-DOLLAR GUESS 27

Admiral Timworth solves the mystery for the ensigns
and amazes them very much.


CHAPTER III--THE STARTLER AT MONTE CARLO 43

Danny turns a trick on a brother officer. Ashore at
Monte Carlo the young ensigns find the makings of
future trouble.


CHAPTER IV--MR. GREEN HAT'S NEW RÔLE 55

Dave loses a human trail and saves a human life.
Then the plot begins to thicken.


CHAPTER V--DANNY GRIN FIGHTS A SMILE 70

Mr. Green Hat sets a trap at the gambling resort,
into which Ensign Dalzell smilingly walks.


CHAPTER VI--DAVE RUNS INTO A REAL THRILL 78

A desperate plot to involve his country heard by
Dave Darrin, who acts swiftly on the information he
has obtained.


CHAPTER VII--THE ADMIRAL UNLOADS HIS MIND 87

Called before the Admiral, the young officers make
their report. The former sends a wireless to
Washington, later summoning the ensigns to his
quarters for secret orders.


CHAPTER VIII--ON LIVELY SPECIAL DUTY 96

A delicate international situation is explained to
Dave and Danny, who are then ordered ashore at
Naples on a special and perilous mission.


CHAPTER IX--M. DALNY PLANS A TRAGEDY 102

Darrin meets one of the men he is looking for. As a
result of that meeting he and Dan are sentenced to
death.


CHAPTER X--TREACHERY HAS THE FLOOR 116

Enticed away for a drive, the Naval officers find
themselves in a disreputable section of Naples and
on the threshold of a tragedy.


CHAPTER XI--HEMMED IN BY THE BRAVOS 124

Dave and Dan are attacked by a mob of Sicilian
bravos and fight a desperate battle to save their
own lives.


CHAPTER XII--EVIL EYES ON SAILORMAN RUNKLE 132

The young officers now discover the real reason for
the attempt on their lives, but, though they do not
know it, fresh perils await them.


CHAPTER XIII--ORDERS CHANGE IN A MINUTE 138

Able Seaman Runkle, bearing an important
communication from Darrin to the Captain of the
U. S. S. "Hudson," gets into serious difficulties.


CHAPTER XIV--DAN HAS VERY "COLD FEET" 151

Beset by spies, the two young officers set out on a
long journey after an exciting start, later finding
that they have been guilty of a grave oversight.


CHAPTER XV--AT THE AMERICAN EMBASSY 161

Dave and Danny arrive in Paris, where they are the
guests of the American Ambassador. Darrin trails an
international plotter and makes an important
discovery.


CHAPTER XVI--"SEEING" THE PARIS APACHES 179

The young ensign, after picking up a valuable clew,
is attacked by savage Paris Apaches, who, angered by
his defense, determine to take his life.


CHAPTER XVII--DAVE'S GUESS AT THE BIG PLOT 189

The details of a plan to involve the United States
in war with England are unfolded to his Admiral by
Ensign Dave.


CHAPTER XVIII--SURIGNY'S NEXT MOVE 198

English and American officers join hands and one
gets a remarkable message from an international
plotter as the trail grows hot.


CHAPTER XIX--TRUTH, OR FRENCH ROMANCE 207

Dave meets an acquaintance and listens to an
astounding confession.


CHAPTER XX--THE ALLIES CLEAR FOR ACTION 213

"A submarine will sink the British battleship
to-night," is the startling information imparted by
Dave to his companions.


CHAPTER XXI--MAKING STERN WORK OF IT 223

The young American Naval officer in command of a
boarding party on the plotter's yacht, is neatly
trapped.


CHAPTER XXII--AFTER THE PEST OF THE SEAS 233

Ensign Darrin and his crew on the Navy launch make
an exciting discovery after accomplishing a
brilliant capture.


CHAPTER XXIII--THE PUZZLE OF THE DEEP 240

While engaged in a thrilling chase after an undersea
boat the launch's company find the tables
unexpectedly turned on them.


CHAPTER XXIV--CONCLUSION 249

The pursuit comes to a stirring finish, with Able
Seaman Runkle's reputation saved and Ensign Darrin
highly honored.





DAVE DARRIN

ON MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE




CHAPTER I

GREEN HAT, THE TROUBLE-STARTER


"Dan," whispered Dave Darrin, Ensign, United States Navy, to his chum
and brother officer, "do you see that fellow with the green Alpine hat
and the green vest?"

"Yes," nodded Dan Dalzell.

"Watch him."

"Why?"

"He's a powerful brute, and it looks as though he's spoiling for a
fight."

"You are not going to oblige him, are you?" asked Dalzell in a
whisper, betraying surprise.

"Nothing like it," Darrin responded disgustedly. "Danny Grin, don't
you credit me with more sense than that? Do you imagine I'd engage in
a fight in a place like this?"

"Then why are you interested in what the fellow might do?" demanded
Ensign Dan.

"Because I think there is going to be a lively time here. That fellow
under the Alpine hat is equal to at least four of these spindling
Spanish waiters. There is going to be trouble within four minutes, or
I'm a poor guesser."

"Just let Mr. Green Hat start something," chuckled Ensign Dalzell in
an undertone. "There are plenty of stalwart British soldiers here, and
'Tommy Atkins' never has been known to be averse to a good fair fight.
The soldiers will wipe up the floor with him. Then there is the
provost guard, patrolling the streets of Gibraltar. If Mr. Green Hat
grows too noisy the provost guard will gather him in."

"And might also gather us in, if the provost officer thought us
intelligent witnesses," muttered Darrin.

"That would be all right, too," grinned Dan. "There is bound to be a
British army officer in command of the provost guard. As soon as we
handed him cards showing us to be American naval officers he'd raise
his cap to us, and that would be the end of it."

"I don't like to be present at rows in a place of this kind," Ensign
Darrin insisted.

"Then we'd better be going," proposed Ensign Dalzell.

The place was Gibraltar, and the time nine o'clock in the evening. The
two friends were seated well back in one of the several Spanish
vaudeville theatres that flourish more or less in the city on the
Great Rock, even in such times as this period of the great European
War.

The theatre was not a low place, or it would not have been permitted
to exist in Gibraltar, which, even in peace times, is under the
strictest military rule, made much more strict at the beginning of the
great war. The performance was an ordinary one and rather dull. At the
moment three Spanish women occupied the stage, going rather hopelessly
through the steps of an aimless dance, while three musicians ground
out the music for the dancers. The next number, as announced on a card
that hung at one side of the stage, was to be a pantomime.

One particularly unpleasant feature only was to be noted in the place.
Wines and liquors were served to those who chose to order them,
Spanish waiters passing up and down the aisles in search of custom.

Mr. Green Hat, to the knowledge of Ensigns Darrin and Dalzell, had
been a much too frequent customer. He was now arguing with two waiters
about an alleged mistake in the changing of the money he had handed
one of them. From angry remonstrance Mr. Green Hat was now resorting
to abusive language.

"I'd like to implant a wallop under that rowdy's chin," muttered Dan
Dalzell, as he started to rise.

"Don't try it," warned Ensign Dave, as he, too, rose.

Just then the lightning struck; the storm broke.

With an angry bellow, Mr. Green Hat leaped to his feet, knocking down
one of the waiters. Four others rushed to the spot. The five promptly
assailed Mr. Green Hat, and were swiftly reinforced by the one who had
been floored.

But the stalwart, active brawler proved to be too much for the
combined force of the waiters. As if they had been so many reeds, Mr.
Green Hat brushed them aside with his fists.

"Grab the bloomin' rotter and throw 'im h'out!" bellowed a "Tommy
Atkins," as the British soldier is collectively known.

A new note, in a decidedly American tone of protest, rose above the
uproar.

"How dare you? What do you mean, fellow?" demanded a young man in a
gray traveling suit, glaring up from the floor, to which he, an
unoffending occupant of an aisle seat, had suddenly been hurled.

It was too much for Dan Dalzell, who promptly attempted to seize Mr.
Green Hat as that individual, with the momentum of a steam roller,
rushed up the aisle.

Dalzell reached out a hand to grip Mr. Green Hat by the collar. All
too promptly a heavy fist smote Dan in the chest, knocking him back
into the arms of Dave Darrin. Dave himself could not act quickly
enough to avenge the blow that had been dealt his chum, because Dan's
body blocked the way.

Four or five British soldiers at the rear of the little theatre tried
to intercept Mr.



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